Wednesday, July 30, 2014

FW: DO THIS FOR ME PLEASE - RESEND/ TOO GREAT NOT TO RESEND !!!



Thank You
Robert Serge
VVA 17 Member
Blog Master
To all my fellow veterans friends and family my we all remember 







From: rserge@venangosupply.com
To: ;
Subject: Fw: DO THIS FOR ME PLEASE - RESEND/ TOO GREAT NOT TO RESEND !!!
Date: Wed, 30 Jul 2014 15:43:57 -0400


From: Mary M
Sent: Tuesday, July 29, 2014 11:39 AM
To: Undisclosed-Recipient:;
Subject: Fw: DO THIS FOR ME PLEASE - RESEND/ TOO GREAT NOT TO RESEND !!!
I know that this has been sent out before, but it is always a good reminder of those who are protecting us and giving of themselves
Subject: Fwd: DO THIS FOR ME PLEASE - RESEND/ TOO GREAT NOT TO RESEND !!!
Never mind the "luck" chain thing—remember our heroes and say a prayer of thanks and protection!
Remember our fallen heroes this Memorial Day weekend.  They died that we might have the privilege to celebrate.  Say a prayer for their families.

"I may not know what tomorrow holds but I know who holds tomorrow.""There is no condition beyond the power of God to heal."
"The will of God will never take you where the Grace of God will not protect you."
Your cell phone is in your pocket.  You're looking at all the pretty girls.
He patrols the streets, searching for insurgents and terrorists.  He's told he will be held over an extra 2 months.

You call your girlfriend and set a date for tonight.
He waits for the mail to see if there is a letter from home.

You hug and kiss your girlfriend, like you do everyday.
He holds his letter close and smells his love's perfume..

You roll your eyes as a baby cries.
He gets a letter with pictures of his new child, and wonders if they'll ever meet.

You criticize your government, and say that war never solves anything.
He sees the innocent tortured and killed by their own people and remembers why he is fighting.

You hear the jokes about the war, and make fun of men like him.
He hears the gunfire, bombs and screams of the wounded.

You see only what the media wants you to see.
He sees the broken bodies lying around him.

You are asked to do something by your parents. You don't.
He does exactly what he is told even if it puts his life in danger.

You stay at home and watch TV.
He takes whatever time he is given to call, write home, sleep, and eat.

You crawl into your soft bed, with down pillows, and get comfortable.
He tries to sleep but gets woken by mortars and helicopters all night long.

If you support your troops, send this to 13 people.

REMEMBER our Troops, and do not forget them LATER
Lest we forget - KEEP THE CHAIN GOING






--
So we do not lose heart. Though our outer self is wasting away, our inner self is being renewed day by day. For this light momentary affliction is preparing for us an eternal weight of glory beyond all comparison,  as we look not to the things that are seen but to the things that are unseen. For the things that are seen are transient, but the things that are unseen are eternal.  ~ Corinthians 4:16-18




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Tuesday, July 29, 2014

looking for info

I am in need of help locating anyone who might know Henry Rurup or Debra Rurup--we received a box full of Henry Rurup's Naval certificates/awards/discharge plus framed photos at the Chapter Hall--someone found them in a container from a yard sale and would like us to find and return to the veteran--I have tried contacting Debra Rurup though facebook with no results--please spread this post throughout the Las Vegas area and beyond--we tried through the VA system, but he does not seem to be registered in Vegas VA....

Friday, July 25, 2014

FW: Radio Program on Services for Veterans at SNVMC.



Thank You
Robert Serge
VVA 17 Member
Blog Master
To all my fellow veterans friends and family my we all remember 



From: rserge1@outlook.com
To: papa_bear_claw@yahoo.com
Subject: FW: Radio Program on Services for Veterans at SNVMC.
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 16:41:29 -0700


I thought that could use this

Thank You
Robert Serge
VVA 17 Member
Blog Master
To all my fellow veterans friends and family my we all remember 



From: rogerhenning@cox.net
To: nvpost76@gmail.com
Subject: Radio Program on Services for Veterans at SNVMC.
Date: Fri, 25 Jul 2014 15:36:23 -0700


I received this note from Rev. James Dancy, our American Legion District 2 Chaplain about asking that you listen tomorrow [Saturday July 26, 2014] on 720 am KDWN radio from 1700 to 1730 [5:00 pm to 5:30 pm in civilian time] to him on Veterans Talk – The Forgotten Promise.  He would also ask that any of you that have personal knowledge of this practice of someone other than the family engaging a minister to officiate at a funeral without approval or knowledge of the family so we can spread the word that many of our Veterans service organizations have chaplains or volunteers that would serve in this capacity for free, as a sign of respect and honor for our fallen service members.  I am requesting, on his behalf the widest dissemination of this chance to help spread the word to our brothers and sisters!  Thanks for your service and I will be listening along with you to this program!

Afternoon Roger, I was wondering if you could put it out that I will be a guest on the radio tomorrow night [Saturday July 26, 2014] on 720 am KDWN "better known as K Don" talking about the fees that funeral directors and or clergy charge for conducting services for our veterans at the Boulder Southern Nevada Veterans Memorial Cemetery.

The average is somewhere between $200 and $400 to have people who have never met the veteran that have passed, and many times do not know the families, yet charge these huge sums for a 20-30 minute service when there's really an American Legion, Vietnam Veterans of America, or Veterans of Foreign Wars or other type of veteran's organization that all have chaplains and many would gladly do it for free!

It sure would be nice if I could get some folks to tune in and maybe call in! The program is Saturday night from 5:00 to 5:30 pm and is called Veterans Talk -- The Forgotten Promise!

Thanks,
Tiny




Roger J. Henning, PhD
Adjutant
Department of Nevada, District 2
2120 CROOKED PINE DRIVE
Las Vegas, NV                       89134

[702] 595-1795
aldist2adj@gmail.com

Sunday, July 20, 2014

FW:



Thank You
Robert Serge
VVA 17 Member
Blog Master
To all my fellow veterans friends and family my we all remember 



Date: Sun, 20 Jul 2014 08:57:02 -0700
From: loumisgm@yahoo.com
To: rserge1@outlook.com
Subject:


Robert:  These are the three major VA Website Links that have been reorganized into the three major VA areas, health, benefits and cemetery.  From these, a veteran can get most anywhere to VA questions and answers.  It may help some of our veterans find what they need through our links. 

I sent another request for an SOP and current member list/email list to the 1076 officers.



image
Veterans Health Administration Home
The Veterans Health Administration is America's largest integrated health care system with over 1,700 sites of care, serving 8.76 million Veterans each year.
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eBenefits - Homepage
Survey modal window opened. Top of Modal Window. Your Feedback is Appreciated Close this window. You can also press the escape key to close the window at any time.
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National Cemetery Administration Home
The VA National Cemetery Administration honors the military service of our Nation's veterans. We provide a dignified burial and lasting memorial for veterans and th...
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Preview by Yahoo
Lou

Thursday, July 17, 2014

HISTORY OF THE VVA



HISTORY OF THE VVA
IN JANUARY 1978, A GROUP OF FIFTEEN VIETNAM VETERAN ADVOCATES GOT TOGETHER IN WASHINGTON, D.C., AND BEGAN THE ORGANIZATION THAT BECAME VIETNAM VETERANS OF AMERICA (VVA).  VVA TODAY IS THE ONLY CONGRESSIONALLY CHARTERED NATIONAL VIETNAM VETERANS SERVICE ORGANIZATION EXCLUSIVELY DEDICATED TO VIETNAM-ERA VETERANS AND THEIR FAMILIES. 
When VVA was formed in the late 1970s, the established national veteran’s organizations and the Veterans Administration had failed for more than a decade to address any of the many issues of concern to Vietnam veterans. As a result, a vacuum existed within the nation’s legislative and public agenda. In January 1978, a group of Vietnam veteran activists came to Washington, D.C., with a bold plan: to form a new veteran’s advocacy organization dedicated exclusively to the needs of Vietnam veterans. 
VVA – initially known as the Vietnam Veterans Coalition and then the Council of Vietnam Veterans – began its work in a small office in downtown Washington, D.C. 
A position paper the group put out soon after it was formed said:
“When the war ended on
April 30, 1975, the American public ended its collective interest in the problem. In seeking to forget the war,
they forgot the veteran as well.” Not long after that,
the organization adopted its founding principle:
“Never again shall one generation of veterans abandon another.”
VVA’s founders envisioned themselves as a lobbying group, not a membership organization. They saw their primary mission as working the halls of Congress, which, in 1978, did not have an organized advocacy group for Vietnam veterans. Therefore one of the organization’s first tasks was to find allies on Capitol Hill. The first member of Congress to sign on was Michigan Democratic Representative David Bonior, a U.S. Air Force Vietnam-era veteran. Bonior not only became VVA’s chief ally in Congress, but he also formed the Vietnam Veterans in Congress caucus and became a key national proponent for immediate change in the nation’s policies toward Vietnam veterans. 
VVA became a membership organization in 1979 and set to work on the issues it remains committed to today: Agent Orange, Post-traumatic Stress Disorder, POW/MIAs, veteran education and job-training programs, homeless veterans, veteran’s benefits, and the wide range of Veterans Administration health issues.
Hindered by the lack of substantial funding for development, membership growth was at first slow. The big breakthrough came when the America hostages returned for Iran in January 1981. It was as if America went through an emotional catharsis that put the issues of the Vietnam era on the table for public discussion. Many Americans questioned why there were parades for the hostages, but not for Vietnam veterans. Many veterans complained about the lack of recognition and appreciation for their service to the nation. Vietnam-era veterans wanted action in the form of programs that would place the latest generation of veterans on the same footing as veterans from previous wars.
In the early 1980’s VVA’s membership grew steadily, and for the first time, the organization secured significant financial contributions. The combination of the public’s willingness to talk about the Vietnam War and the basic issues that it raised, as well as the veterans themselves coming forward, was augmented by the dedication of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial on the Mall in Washington, D.C., in November 1982. The week-long activities rekindled a sense of brotherhood among veterans and a feeling that they shared an experience that was too significant to ignore.
In 1983, VVA took a significant step by setting up its Vietnam Veterans of America Legal Services (VVALS) to provide assistance to veterans seeking benefits and services from the government. VVALS worked under the theory that a veteran’s representative should be an advocate for the veteran rather than simply a facilitator, and quickly established itself as the most competent and aggressive legal-assistance program available to veterans. VVALS went on to publish the most comprehensive manual ever developed for veteran service representatives, and in 1985, VVALS wrote the widely acclaimed Viet Vet Survival Guide, more than 150,000 copies of which are now in print. 
In the mid and late 1980s VVA grew in size, stature, and prestige. VVA’s professional membership services, veteran services, and advocacy work gained the respect of Congress and the veterans community. In 1986, VVA’s exemplary work was formally acknowledged by the granting of a congressional charter.
The plight of Vietnam Veterans, particularly in the lack of VA help with what is now known as PTSD, got the attention of the DAV Leadership.  It came in the form of Vietnam Veterans, some who completed studies in mental health, and along with the newly formed VVA,  convinced them to reach out to Vietnam Veterans in the largest cities.  Those Vietnam Veterans found hundreds of good counselors to volunteer, and the DAV funded and opened store front counseling centers.  It helped our veterans.  It convinced the VA and government that more was needed.  This resulted in the establishment of the VA Veterans Readjustment Counseling Service.  Now over 300 strong, these Vet Centers are still working with our combat Veterans from current and recent conflicts as well as others from previous wars.
In keeping with an old tradition of “Veterans Helping Veterans,” started by the JWV helping the VFW get started after the Spanish American War, VVA followed suit.  They provided space, money and expertise to help a newly formed Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America get started.  They loved up to their motto.

“Never again shall one generation of veterans abandon another.”

Sunday, July 13, 2014

FW: Vietnam virtual wall



Thank You
Robert Serge
VVA 17 Member
Blog Master
To all my fellow veterans friends and family my we all remember 



From: akan01@centurylink.net
To: rserge1@outlook.com
Subject: Vietnam virtual wall
Date: Sun, 13 Jul 2014 11:15:58 -0700


Bob,

I don't know if you have seen this before. It may be of interest to several organizations. Joel


Subject: Vietnam virtual wall




 


This is really sobering



Remarkable how much detail is found here.

This is really sobering.  Click on the link and find the city
you went to high school and look at the names. 
Click on the name and it will give details of the death.
 Vietnam Wall


First click on a state.  When it opens, scroll down to the city
and the names will appear. 
Then click on their names.  It should show you a picture of
the person, or at least their bio and medals. 

This really is an amazing web site.  Someone spent a lot of
time and effort to create it. 

I hope that everyone who receives this appreciates what
those who served in Vietnam sacrificed for our country. 

The link below is a virtual wall of all those lost during the
Vietnam war with the names, bio's and other information on
our lost heroes.  Those who remember that time frame, or
perhaps lost friends or family can look them up on this site.

Pass the link on to others, as many knew wonderful people
whose names are listed. 












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Thursday, July 10, 2014

CHAPTER MEETINGS

 

clip_image002

CHAPTER MEETINGS
DATES & TIMES
CHAPTER 1076
2nd. THURSDAY EACH MONTH
7:00 PM
AT THE VFW BASIC POST 3848
401 WEST LAK MEADE
HENDERSON, NEVADA
PRESIDENT:
(702) 396-2338 (message)











Tuesday, July 8, 2014

FW: Forwarding a look at General of The Army Omar N. Bradley

just click on link below to read the info

General of The Army Omar N. Bradley


Thank You
Robert Serge
VVA 17 Member
Blog Master
To all my fellow veterans friends and family my we all remember 



Date: Tue, 8 Jul 2014 01:12:07 -0700
From: loumisgm@yahoo.com
Subject: Forwarding a look at General of The Army Omar N. Bradley
To: loumicsm@yahoo.com

With all the scandal going on around the VA these days, investigations, firings, hirings, I took a look back in history for sequels.  There were several.  A big one was just prior to WWII when kickbacks were in full bloom. 

At the end of the war, General Bradley was appointed Director of the VA.  If you think todays problems there are at their worst, look over the item I attached.  In brief it covers the mess General Bradley battled and won.  

What the General brought to the VA were simple things like honesty, integrity, and character. 

There is room for improving our current VA culture of corruption.  Look back to the past, maybe some of the same things from 70 years ago can work again.
Lou